Probio expands international portfolio

Kris Baker-Rain

Probio expands international portfolio

A North East-based alternative fuel provider is expanding its international portfolio after relocating to support its ambitious long-term plans.

Probio Energy International’s managing director Kris Baker-Rain has been reviewing Probio’s objectives as it continues to expand its overseas operations and position itself as a market leader in the delivery of quality waste derived fuels.

He hopes that company’s new offices, based in Team Valley in Gateshead, will help with the plans.

Probio has recently delivered a significant order with a cement plant in Bulgaria for the supply of SRF (solid recoverable fuel) to add to the company’s existing international contracts, which include the supply of both SRF and RDF (refuse derived fuel) to countries like Denmark, Greece, Norway and Sweden.

Kris Baker-Rain said: “Our growth over the last few years has been rapid which is certainly down to the shift in attitudes towards waste disposal.

“There’s a real commitment to turn waste into energy rather than sending it to landfill.

“Scandinavian countries are certainly well ahead in this area. In Sweden 36,000 homes are powered entirely from energy converted from waste at one of the power plants we supply with our RDF and children are educated about the importance of waste management.

 “Closer to home we are moving in the right direction but I do think there’s still a lack of understanding of what actually happens to our household waste. Every little bit of rubbish must be sifted through and separated so putting waste into the right bins is so important, and that’s something that I don’t think we do that well.

“We have recently worked with E.on in Sweden to create some educational videos to inform the general public about Probio’s role in ensuring the delivery of quality RDF. The videos also show the full journey household waste goes on after being placed in the bin as we continue to divert waste from landfill

“There’s so much more we can be doing to ensure the waste we generate can be converted into energy – do we really want it ending up in the ground when it could be powering our homes?”