Farming in the blood

Farming in the blood

Growing up on a livestock farm at Marske in Swaledale, it was feasible that I would become a farmer and as a youngster, I was farming daft. But as I got older I realised it simply wasn’t for me, writes Jonathan Simpson, a chartered surveyor at Sanderson Weatherall’s Teesside office
More importantly for my teenaged self, the 24/7, 365 days a year demands were likely to get in the way of my obsession with playing football and cricket. These considerations, and potential complications with the way the partnership established to run the family farm was set up, led me to explore other options. Having spent some time gaining work experience with an estate agent in Richmond, I made my choice.

Looking back now, much as I love working in the commercial property market, I suspect farming might not have been a bad option for me. I always envied my parents, the fact that their work allowed them to be in and out of the family environment all day. I see a better balance in life on the farm than you perhaps get in the corporate world. While it is great that I am out and about a lot, meeting people and seeing the North East and North Yorkshire in my current job, the outdoors element of farming appeals greatly. Add to that the ability to live your life without being tied to multiple technological communications devices; it is a simpler life, yet probably a lot harder than the one I live now.

The ability to plan by the demands of the seasons and the weekly Countryfile weather forecast is a very civilised way of doing things.Being in control of my own destiny also holds strong appeal, knowing the decisions you make are your own and your day is not subject to other people’s whims – only those of the weather. With a family interest still in the 700 acre farm I grew up on, the dream isn’t completely dead.

But I suspect I will remain tied to my phone and the world of commercial property, looking wistfully on as my travels take me past the open fields of my childhood